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  • Course Builder now supports scheduling, easier customization and more
    Posted by Adam Feldman, Product Manager and Pavel Simakov, Technical Lead, Course Builder Team

    Over the years, we've learned that there are as many ways to run an online course as there are instructors to run them. Today's release of Course Builder v1.11 has a focus on improved student access controls, easier visual customization and a new course explorer. Additionally, we've added better support for deploying from Windows!

    Improved student access controls
    A course's availability is often dynamic - sometimes you want to make a course available to everyone all at once, while other times may call for the course to be available to some students before others. Perhaps registration will be available for a while and then the course later becomes read-only. To support these use cases, we've added Student Groups and Calendar Triggers.

    • Student Groups allow you to define which students can see which parts of a course. Want your morning class to see unit 5 and your afternoon class to see unit 6 -- while letting random Internet visitors only see unit 1? Student groups have you covered.
    • Calendar Triggers can be used to update course or content availability automatically at a specific time. For instance, if your course goes live at midnight on Sunday night, you don't need to be at a computer to make it happen. Or, if you want to unlock a new unit every week, you can set up a trigger to automate the process. Read more about calendar triggers and availability.

    You can even use these features together. Say you want to start a new group of students through the course every month, giving each access to one new unit per week. Using Student Groups and Calendar Triggers together, you can achieve this cohort-like functionality.

    Easier visual customization
    In the past, if you wanted to customize Course Builder's student experience beyond a certain point, you needed to be a Python developer. We heard from many web developers that they would like to be able to create their own student-facing pages, too. With this release, Course Builder includes a GraphQL server that allows you to create your own frontend experience, while still letting Course Builder take care of things like user sessions and statefulness.

    New course explorer
    Large Course Builder partners such as Google's Digital Workshop and NPTEL have many courses and students with diverse needs. To help them, we've completely revamped the Course Explorer page, giving it richer information and interactivity, so your students can find which of your courses they're looking for. You can provide categories and start/end dates, in addition to the course title, abstract and instructor information.
    In v1.11, we've added several new highly requested features. Together, they help make Course Builder easier to use and customize, giving you the flexibility to schedule things in advance.

    We've come a long way since releasing our first experimental code over 4 years ago, turning Course Builder into a large open-source Google App Engine application with over 5 million student registrations across all Course Builder users. With these latest additions, we consider Course Builder feature complete and fully capable of delivering online learning at any scale. We will continue to provide support and bug fixes for those using the platform.

    We hope you’ll enjoy these new features and share how you’re using them in the forum. Keep on learning!

  • Equality of Opportunity in Machine Learning
    Posted by Moritz Hardt, Research Scientist, Google Brain Team

    As machine learning technology progresses rapidly, there is much interest in understanding its societal impact. A particularly successful branch of machine learning is supervised learning. With enough past data and computational resources, learning algorithms often produce surprisingly effective predictors of future events. To take one hypothetical example: an algorithm could, for example, be used to predict with high accuracy who will pay back their loan. Lenders might then use such a predictor as an aid in deciding who should receive a loan in the first place. Decisions based on machine learning can be both incredibly useful and have a profound impact on our lives.

    Even the best predictors make mistakes. Although machine learning aims to minimize the chance of a mistake, how do we prevent certain groups from experiencing a disproportionate share of these mistakes? Consider the case of a group that we have relatively little data on and whose characteristics differ from those of the general population in ways that are relevant to the prediction task. As prediction accuracy is generally correlated with the amount of data available for training, it is likely that incorrect predictions will be more common in this group. A predictor might, for example, end up flagging too many individuals in this group as ‘high risk of default’ even though they pay back their loan. When group membership coincides with a sensitive attribute, such as race, gender, disability, or religion, this situation can lead to unjust or prejudicial outcomes.

    Despite the need, a vetted methodology in machine learning for preventing this kind of discrimination based on sensitive attributes has been lacking. A naive approach might require a set of sensitive attributes to be removed from the data before doing anything else with it. This idea of “fairness through unawareness,” however, fails due to the existence of “redundant encodings.” Even if a particular attribute is not present in the data, combinations of other attributes can act as a proxy.

    Another common approach, called demographic parity, asks that the prediction must be uncorrelated with the sensitive attribute. This might sound intuitively desirable, but the outcome itself is often correlated with the sensitive attribute. For example, the incidence of heart failure is substantially more common in men than in women. When predicting such a medical condition, it is therefore neither realistic nor desirable to prevent all correlation between the predicted outcome and group membership.

    Equal Opportunity

    Taking these conceptual difficulties into account, we’ve proposed a methodology for measuring and preventing discrimination based on a set of sensitive attributes. Our framework not only helps to scrutinize predictors to discover possible concerns. We also show how to adjust a given predictor so as to strike a better tradeoff between classification accuracy and non-discrimination if need be.

    At the heart of our approach is the idea that individuals who qualify for a desirable outcome should have an equal chance of being correctly classified for this outcome. In our fictional loan example, it means the rate of ‘low risk’ predictions among people who actually pay back their loan should not depend on a sensitive attribute like race or gender. We call this principle equality of opportunity in supervised learning.

    When implemented, our framework also improves incentives by shifting the cost of poor predictions from the individual to the decision maker, who can respond by investing in improved prediction accuracy. Perfect predictors always satisfy our notion, showing that the central goal of building more accurate predictors is well aligned with the goal of avoiding discrimination.

    Learn more

    To explore the ideas in this blog post on your own, our Big Picture team created a beautiful interactive visualization of the different concepts and tradeoffs. So, head on over to their page to learn more.

    Once you’ve walked through the demo, please check out the full version of our paper, a joint work with Eric Price (UT Austin) and Nati Srebro (TTI Chicago). We’ll present the paper at this year’s Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) in Barcelona. So, if you’re around, be sure to stop by and chat with one of us.

    Our paper is by no means the final word on this important and complex topic. It joins an ongoing conversation with a multidisciplinary focus of research. We hope to inspire future research that will sharpen the discussion of the different achievable tradeoffs surrounding discrimination and machine learning, as well as the development of tools that will help practitioners address these challenges.

  • Graph-powered Machine Learning at Google
    Posted by Sujith Ravi, Staff Research Scientist, Google Research

    Recently, there have been significant advances in Machine Learning that enable computer systems to solve complex real-world problems. One of those advances is Google’s large scale, graph-based machine learning platform, built by the Expander team in Google Research. A technology that is behind many of the Google products and features you may use everyday, graph-based machine learning is a powerful tool that can be used to power useful features such as reminders in Inbox and smart messaging in Allo, or used in conjunction with deep neural networks to power the latest image recognition system in Google Photos.
    Learning with Minimal Supervision

    Much of the recent success in deep learning, and machine learning in general, can be attributed to models that demonstrate high predictive capacity when trained on large amounts of labeled data -- often millions of training examples. This is commonly referred to as “supervised learning” since it requires supervision, in the form of labeled data, to train the machine learning systems. (Conversely, some machine learning methods operate directly on raw data without any supervision, a paradigm referred to as unsupervised learning.)

    However, the more difficult the task, the harder it is to get sufficient high-quality labeled data. It is often prohibitively labor intensive and time-consuming to collect labeled data for every new problem. This motivated the Expander research team to build new technology for powering machine learning applications at scale and with minimal supervision.

    Expander’s technology draws inspiration from how humans learn to generalize and bridge the gap between what they already know (labeled information) and novel, unfamiliar observations (unlabeled information). Known as “semi-supervised” learning, this powerful technique enables us to build systems that can work in situations where training data may be sparse. One of the key advantages to a graph-based semi-supervised machine learning approach is the fact that (a) one models labeled and unlabeled data jointly during learning, leveraging the underlying structure in the data, (b) one can easily combine multiple types of signals (for example, relational information from Knowledge Graph along with raw features) into a single graph representation and learn over them. This is in contrast to other machine learning approaches, such as neural network methods, in which it is typical to first train a system using labeled data with features and then apply the trained system to unlabeled data.

    Graph Learning: How It Works

    At its core, Expander’s platform combines semi-supervised machine learning with large-scale graph-based learning by building a multi-graph representation of the data with nodes corresponding to objects or concepts and edges connecting concepts that share similarities. The graph typically contains both labeled data (nodes associated with a known output category or label) and unlabeled data (nodes for which no labels were provided). Expander’s framework then performs semi-supervised learning to label all nodes jointly by propagating label information across the graph.

    However, this is easier said than done! We have to (1) learn efficiently at scale with minimal supervision (i.e., tiny amount of labeled data), (2) operate over multi-modal data (i.e., heterogeneous representations and various sources of data), and (3) solve challenging prediction tasks (i.e., large, complex output spaces) involving high dimensional data that might be noisy.

    One of the primary ingredients in the entire learning process is the graph and choice of connections. Graphs come in all sizes, shapes and can be combined from multiple sources. We have observed that it is often beneficial to learn over multi-graphs that combine information from multiple types of data representations (e.g., image pixels, object categories and chat response messages for PhotoReply in Allo). The Expander team’s graph learning platform automatically generates graphs directly from data based on the inferred or known relationships between data elements. The data can be structured (for example, relational data) or unstructured (for example, sparse or dense feature representations extracted from raw data).

    To understand how Expander’s system learns, let us consider an example graph shown below.

    There are two types of nodes in the graph: “grey” represents unlabeled data whereas the colored nodes represent labeled data. Relationships between node data is represented via edges and thickness of each edge indicates strength of the connection. We can formulate the semi-supervised learning problem on this toy graph as follows: predict a color (“red” or “blue”) for every node in the graph. Note that the specific choice of graph structure and colors depend on the task. For example, as shown in this research paper we recently published, a graph that we built for the Smart Reply feature in Inbox represents email messages as nodes and colors indicate semantic categories of user responses (e.g., “yes”, “awesome”, “funny”).

    The Expander graph learning framework solves this labeling task by treating it as an optimization problem. At the simplest level, it learns a color label assignment for every node in the graph such that neighboring nodes are assigned similar colors depending on the strength of their connection. A naive way to solve this would be to try to learn a label assignment for all nodes at once -- this method does not scale to large graphs. Instead, we can optimize the problem formulation by propagating colors from labeled nodes to their neighbors, and then repeating the process. In each step, an unlabeled node is assigned a label by inspecting color assignments of its neighbors. We can update every node’s label in this manner and iterate until the whole graph is colored. This process is a far more efficient way to optimize the same problem and the sequence of iterations converges to a unique solution in this case. The solution at the end of the graph propagation looks something like this:
    Semi-supervised learning on a graph
    In practice, we use complex optimization functions defined over the graph structure, which incorporate additional information and constraints for semi-supervised graph learning that can lead to hard, non-convex problems. The real challenge, however, is to scale this efficiently to graphs containing billions of nodes, trillions of edges and for complex tasks involving billions of different label types.

    To tackle this challenge, we created an approach outlined in Large Scale Distributed Semi-Supervised Learning Using Streaming Approximation, published last year. It introduces a streaming algorithm to process information propagated from neighboring nodes in a distributed manner that makes it work on very large graphs. In addition, it addresses other practical concerns, notably it guarantees that the space complexity or memory requirements of the system stays constant regardless of the difficulty of the task, i.e., the overall system uses the same amount of memory regardless of whether the number of prediction labels is two (as in the above toy example) or a million or even a billion. This enables wide-ranging applications for natural language understanding, machine perception, user modeling and even joint multimodal learning for tasks involving multiple modalities such as text, image and video inputs.

    Language Graphs for Learning Humor

    As an example use of graph-based machine learning, consider emotion labeling, a language understanding task in Smart Reply for Inbox, where the goal is to label words occurring in natural language text with their fine-grained emotion categories. A neural network model is first applied to a text corpus to learn word embeddings, i.e., a mathematical vector representation of the meaning of each word. The dense embedding vectors are then used to build a sparse graph where nodes correspond to words and edges represent semantic relationship between them. Edge strength is computed using similarity between embedding vectors — low similarity edges are ignored. We seed the graph with emotion labels known a priori for a few nodes (e.g., laugh is labeled as “funny”) and then apply semi-supervised learning over the graph to discover emotion categories for remaining words (e.g., ROTFL gets labeled as “funny” owing to its multi-hop semantic connection to the word “laugh”).
    Learning emotion associations using graph constructed from word embedding vectors
    For applications involving large datasets or dense representations that are observed (e.g., pixels from images) or learned using neural networks (e.g., embedding vectors), it is infeasible to compute pairwise similarity between all objects to construct edges in the graph. The Expander team solves this problem by leveraging approximate, linear-time graph construction algorithms.

    Graph-based Machine Intelligence in Action

    The Expander team’s machine learning system is now being used on massive graphs (containing billions of nodes and trillions of edges) to recognize and understand concepts in natural language, images, videos, and queries, powering Google products for applications like reminders, question answering, language translation, visual object recognition, dialogue understanding, and more.

    We are excited that with the recent release of Allo, millions of chat users are now experiencing smart messaging technology powered by the Expander team’s system for understanding and assisting with chat conversations in multiple languages. Also, this technology isn’t used only for large-scale models in the cloud - as announced this past week, Android Wear has opened up an on-device Smart Reply capability for developers that will provide smart replies for any messaging application. We’re excited to tackle even more challenging Internet-scale problems with Expander in the years to come.


    We wish to acknowledge the hard work of all the researchers, engineers, product managers, and leaders across Google who helped make this technology a success. In particular, we would like to highlight the efforts of Allan Heydon, Andrei Broder, Andrew Tomkins, Ariel Fuxman, Bo Pang, Dana Movshovitz-Attias, Fritz Obermeyer, Krishnamurthy Viswanathan, Patrick McGregor, Peter Young, Robin Dua, Sujith Ravi and Vivek Ramavajjala.

  • How Robots Can Acquire New Skills from Their Shared Experience
    Posted by Sergey Levine (Google Brain Team), Timothy Lillicrap (DeepMind), Mrinal Kalakrishnan (X)

    The ability to learn from experience will likely be a key in enabling robots to help with complex real-world tasks, from assisting the elderly with chores and daily activities, to helping us in offices and hospitals, to performing jobs that are too dangerous or unpleasant for people. However, if each robot must learn its full repertoire of skills for these tasks only from its own experience, it could take far too long to acquire a rich enough range of behaviors to be useful. Could we bridge this gap by making it possible for robots to collectively learn from each other’s experiences?

    While machine learning algorithms have made great strides in natural language understanding and speech recognition, the kind of symbolic high-level reasoning that allows people to communicate complex concepts in words remains out of reach for machines. However, robots can instantaneously transmit their experience to other robots over the network - sometimes known as "cloud robotics" - and it is this ability that can let them learn from each other.

    This is true even for seemingly simple low-level skills. Humans and animals excel at adaptive motor control that integrates their senses, reflexes, and muscles in a closely coordinated feedback loop. Robots still struggle with these basic skills in the real world, where the variability and complexity of the environment demands well-honed behaviors that are not easily fooled by distractors. If we enable robots to transmit their experiences to each other, could they learn to perform motion skills in close coordination with sensing in realistic environments?

    We previously wrote about how multiple robots could pool their experiences to learn a grasping task. Here, we will discuss new experiments that we conducted to investigate three possible approaches for general-purpose skill learning across multiple robots: learning motion skills directly from experience, learning internal models of physics, and learning skills with human assistance. In all three cases, multiple robots shared their experiences to build a common model of the skill. The skills learned by the robots are still relatively simple -- pushing objects and opening doors -- but by learning such skills more quickly and efficiently through collective learning, robots might in the future acquire richer behavioral repertoires that could eventually make it possible for them to assist us in our daily lives.

    Learning from raw experience with model-free reinforcement learning.
    Perhaps one of the simplest ways for robots to teach each other is to pool information about their successes and failures in the world. Humans and animals acquire many skills by direct trial-and-error learning. During this kind of ‘model-free’ learning -- so called because there is no explicit model of the environment formed -- they explore variations on their existing behavior and then reinforce and exploit the variations that give bigger rewards. In combination with deep neural networks, model-free algorithms have recently proved to be surprisingly effective and have been key to successes with the Atari video game system and playing Go. Having multiple robots allows us to experiment with sharing experiences to speed up this kind of direct learning in the real world.

    In these experiments we tasked robots with trying to move their arms to goal locations, or reaching to and opening a door. Each robot has a copy of a neural network that allows it to estimate the value of taking a given action in a given state. By querying this network, the robot can quickly decide what actions might be worth taking in the world. When a robot acts, we add noise to the actions it selects, so the resulting behavior is sometimes a bit better than previously observed, and sometimes a bit worse. This allows each robot to explore different ways of approaching a task. Records of the actions taken by the robots, their behaviors, and the final outcomes are sent back to a central server. The server collects the experiences from all of the robots and uses them to iteratively improve the neural network that estimates value for different states and actions. The model-free algorithms we employed look across both good and bad experiences and distill these into a new network that is better at understanding how action and success are related. Then, at regular intervals, each robot takes a copy of the updated network from the server and begins to act using the information in its new network. Given that this updated network is a bit better at estimating the true value of actions in the world, the robots will produce better behavior. This cycle can then be repeated to continue improving on the task. In the video below, a robot explores the door opening task.
    With a few hours of practice, robots sharing their raw experience learn to make reaches to targets, and to open a door by making contact with the handle and pulling. In the case of door opening, the robots learn to deal with the complex physics of the contacts between the hook and the door handle without building an explicit model of the world, as can be seen in the example below:
    Learning how the world works by interacting with objects.
    Direct trial-and-error reinforcement learning is a great way to learn individual skills. However, humans and animals don’t learn exclusively by trial and error. We also build mental models about our environment and imagine how the world might change in response to our actions.

    We can start with the simplest of physical interactions, and have our robots learn the basics of cause and effect from reflecting on their own experiences. In this experiment, we had the robots play with a wide variety of common household objects by randomly prodding and pushing them inside a tabletop bin. The robots again shared their experiences with each other and together built a single predictive model that attempted to forecast what the world might look like in response to their actions. This predictive model can make simple, if slightly blurry, forecasts about future camera images when provided with the current image and a possible sequence of actions that the robot might execute:
    Top row: robotic arms interacting with common household items.
    Bottom row: Predicted future camera images given an initial image and a sequence of actions.
    Once this model is trained, the robots can use it to perform purposeful manipulations, for example based on user commands. In our prototype, a user can command the robot to move a particular object simply by clicking on that object, and then clicking on the point where the object should go:
    The robots in this experiment were not told anything about objects or physics: they only see that the command requires a particular pixel to be moved to a particular place. However, because they have seen so many object interactions in their shared past experiences, they can forecast how particular actions will affect particular pixels. In order for such an implicit understanding of physics to emerge, the robots must be provided with a sufficient breadth of experience. This requires either a lot of time, or sharing the combined experiences of many robots. An extended video on this project may be found here.
    Learning with the help of humans.
    So far, we discussed how robots can learn entirely on their own. However, human guidance is important, not just for telling the robot what to do, but also for helping the robots along. We have a lot of intuition about how various manipulation skills can be performed, and it only seems natural that transferring this intuition to robots can help them learn these skills a lot faster. In the next experiment, we provided each robot with a different door, and guided each of them by hand to show how these doors can be opened. These demonstrations are encoded into a single combined strategy for all robots, called a policy. The policy is a deep neural network which converts camera images to robot actions, and is maintained on a central server. The following video shows the instructor demonstrating the door-opening skill to a robot:
    Next, the robots collectively improve this policy through a trial-and-error learning process. Each robot attempts to open its own door using the latest available policy, with some added noise for exploration. These attempts allow each robot to plan a better strategy for opening the door the next time around, and improve the policy accordingly:
    Not surprisingly, we find that robots learn more effectively if they are trained on a curriculum of tasks that are gradually increasing in difficulty. In our experiment, each robot starts off by practicing the door-opening skill on a specific position and orientation of the door that the instructor had previously shown it. As it gets better at performing the task, the instructor starts to alter the position and orientation of the door to be just a bit beyond the current capabilities of the policy, but not so difficult that it fails entirely. This allows the robots to gradually increase their skill level over time, and expands the range of situations they can handle. The combination of human-guidance with trial-and-error learning allowed the robots to collectively learn the skill of door-opening in just a couple of hours. Since the robots were trained on doors that look different from each other, the final policy succeeds on a door with a handle that none of the robots had seen before:
    In all three of the experiments described above, the ability to communicate and exchange their experiences allows the robots to learn more quickly and effectively. This becomes particularly important when we combine robotic learning with deep learning, as is the case in all of the experiments discussed above. We’ve seen before that deep learning works best when provided with ample training data. For example, the popular ImageNet benchmark uses over 1.5 million labeled examples. While such a quantity of data is not impossible for a single robot to gather over a few years, it is much more efficient to gather the same volume of experience from multiple robots over the course of a few weeks. Besides faster learning times, this approach might benefit from the greater diversity of experience: a real-world deployment might involve multiple robots in different places and different settings, sharing heterogeneous, varied experiences to build a single highly generalizable representation.

    Of course, the kinds of behaviors that robots today can learn are still quite limited. Even basic motion skills, such as picking up objects and opening doors, remain in the realm of cutting edge research. In all of these experiments, a human engineer is still needed to tell the robots what they should learn to do by specifying a detailed objective function. However, as algorithms improve and robots are deployed more widely, their ability to share and pool their experiences could be instrumental for enabling them to assist us in our daily lives.

    The experiments on learning by trial-and-error were conducted by Shixiang (Shane) Gu and Ethan Holly from the Google Brain team, and Timothy Lillicrap from DeepMind. Work on learning predictive models was conducted by Chelsea Finn from the Google Brain team, and the research on learning from demonstration was conducted by Yevgen Chebotar, Ali Yahya, Adrian Li, and Mrinal Kalakrishnan from X. We would also like to acknowledge contributions by Peter Pastor, Gabriel Dulac-Arnold, and Jon Scholz. Articles about each of the experiments discussed in this blog post can be found below:

    Deep Reinforcement Learning for Robotic Manipulation. Shixiang Gu, Ethan Holly, Timothy Lillicrap, Sergey Levine. [video]

    Deep Visual Foresight for Planning Robot Motion. Chelsea Finn, Sergey Levine. [video] [data]

    Collective Robot Reinforcement Learning with Distributed Asynchronous Guided Policy Search.
    Ali Yahya, Adrian Li, Mrinal Kalakrishnan, Yevgen Chebotar, Sergey Levine.  [video]

    Path Integral Guided Policy Search. Yevgen Chebotar, Mrinal Kalakrishnan, Ali Yahya, Adrian Li, Stefan Schaal, Sergey Levine. [video]

  • Introducing the Open Images Dataset
    Posted by Ivan Krasin and Tom Duerig, Software Engineers

    In the last few years, advances in machine learning have enabled Computer Vision to progress rapidly, allowing for systems that can automatically caption images to apps that can create natural language replies in response to shared photos. Much of this progress can be attributed to publicly available image datasets, such as ImageNet and COCO for supervised learning, and YFCC100M for unsupervised learning.

    Today, we introduce Open Images, a dataset consisting of ~9 million URLs to images that have been annotated with labels spanning over 6000 categories. We tried to make the dataset as practical as possible: the labels cover more real-life entities than the 1000 ImageNet classes, there are enough images to train a deep neural network from scratch and the images are listed as having a Creative Commons Attribution license*.

    The image-level annotations have been populated automatically with a vision model similar to Google Cloud Vision API. For the validation set, we had human raters verify these automated labels to find and remove false positives. On average, each image has about 8 labels assigned. Here are some examples:
    Annotated images form the Open Images dataset. Left: Ghost Arches by Kevin Krejci. Right: Some Silverware by J B. Both images used under CC BY 2.0 license
    We have trained an Inception v3 model based on Open Images annotations alone, and the model is good enough to be used for fine-tuning applications as well as for other things, like DeepDream or artistic style transfer which require a well developed hierarchy of filters. We hope to improve the quality of the annotations in Open Images the coming months, and therefore the quality of models which can be trained.

    The dataset is a product of a collaboration between Google, CMU and Cornell universities, and there are a number of research papers built on top of the Open Images dataset in the works. It is our hope that datasets like Open Images and the recently released YouTube-8M will be useful tools for the machine learning community.

    * While we tried to identify images that are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license, we make no representations or warranties regarding the license status of each image and you should verify the license for each image yourself.

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